Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Francis: Liberal Catholic? Conservative Catholic? or Roman Catholic?

Fr. Richard McBrien
But I, brethren, could not address you as spiritual men, but as men of the flesh, as babes in Christ.   I fed you with milk, not solid food; for you were not ready for it; and even yet you are not ready, for you are still of the flesh. For while there is jealousy and strife among you, are you not of the flesh, and behaving like ordinary men? For when one says, "I belong to Paul," and another, "I belong to Apollos," are you not merely men?     -1 Corinthians 3; 1-4
                                                                                                                  

 IN THE SMOKE OF SATAN, I WROTE:

"Lest we forget, there were indeed reform-minded Council Fathers who responded to Pope John’s vision of the Church growing in spiritual riches. Archbishop Wojtyla of Krakow was first among them. Given what has been said thus far, it should not surprise the reader that many “progressive Catholics” regarded the pontificate of John Paul II as too “conservative,” as out of touch with the modern world, while the traditionalists view many of the Pope’s writings and teachings as modernist in outlook.

Thus the schema of “liberal” (progressive, left) vs. “conservative” (traditionalist, right) which followed upon the close of Vatican II is wholly inadequate for explaining the present-day crisis of faith within the Church of Jesus Christ, though it is most unfortunate that usage of these terms persist among many Catholics and in the media today. Division within Christ’s Church is a clear attack by the evil one. Satan’s strategy here is the time-honored one of divide et impera—divide and conquer. Remember, too, Jesus ’ words to the Pharisees: “Every kingdom divided against itself is laid waste, and no city or house divided against itself will stand.” Quite simply, no ideology, no matter how sincerely embraced, may substitute for personal conversion...." 
Fr. John Hardon, S.J.

What does this have to do with Pope Francis? Read this talk by the Archbishop of Philly, whose diocese Il Santissimo Padre will soon visit.